Nana Bonsu Black History project website officially launched

This Black History project website was officially launched on 21st June at the fantastic event at Z-Arts.  In addition to the amazing exhibition and the array of speakers, performances and the film showing, there was Kooj Chuhan (Metaceptive Media) who presented this website to the audience.

2014-06-21 18.21.25The key things about this website are:

  • Design – using a style that looks professional and clear but does not look corporate, over technological or austere.  I wanted it to reflect a sense of warmth and community, along with the Pan-African background colours reflecting perspectives that were so central to Nana’s beliefs and work.
  • Home Page – this is a snapshot of the content that is on the website, as well as creating a portrait reflecting Nana’s life and work.  It uses a graphic magazine-style format including an image slider so that there are 9 image-links directly from the home page to key parts of the website plus the link to the 100 Great Black Britons website.
  • Functionality – the site has an easy to navigate menu system, and directly from the home page you can see the range of material that is available – the different kinds of information as well as downloads and video.
  • 2014-06-21 18.21.54Content – the website contains 18 web-pages describing different aspects of Nana’s life and work; 21 video interviews; various PDF downloads including the magazine; the keynote film “Celebrating Nana Bonsu”; a photographic archive; and a simple blog of news updates.
  • Social media – each page of the website has little icons at the bottom that can be clicked to immediately share that page via Facebook or Twitter.  There are continually visible Facebook, Twitter and YouTube symbols at the top of the website which lead to First Cuts own pages that can be liked or followed for future updates and support.
  • Comments – people who visit the website can add their comments to any page if they wish.   This gives the website the opportunity for different views and perspectives on Nana Bonsu and the subject matter to be expressed.
  • Fully optimised for search engines – so that Google and the rest can index and locate the website easily when anyone searches for information about Nana.

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“Nana Bonsu” Oral History – new website by Kooj / Metaceptive Media now live

NanaBonsuWebsiteHomePageKooj at Metaceptive Media was commissioned by First Cut to design and build the website for the HLF-funded ‘Nana Bonsu Oral History Project‘, which he has been working on for over 6 months beginning with a short training course he delivered in autumn 2013.  Finally, the website has now gone live and will be officially launched at a vibrant event at Manchester’s Z-Arts on Saturday 21st June 2014.

Nana Bonsu, also known as Beresford ‘Berry’ Edwards, was of huge importance to Britain’s African community, especially in Manchester which became his home. This oral history project highlights his role in initiatives such as the Campaign Against Racial Discrimination, trade unions, social justice and equal opportunities. Nana’s work, committment and contribution is now nationally recognised by his inclusion in the list of 100 Great Black Britons.

Full details about the project and the event this Saturday are available from the website itself (of course!), at www.nanabonsu.com – please leave some comments on the site if you visit it, or send Kooj a message if you like.

Short film “No Trace” starring the late great Brian Morgan, now on YouTube

Brian’s very recent and terribly tragic death is a loss to so many of us, he was a remarkable man and actor – probably the best I have worked with.  I have now put the short film I directed, written by Peter Kalu and of course starring Brian Morgan, on to YouTube so its hopefully easier to find.  (Up until now its only been on Vimeo).  Here it is, hopefully a fitting tribute:

No Trace

A short drama film which explores the abuse and haunting of the city, the daily struggle to maintain a shred of integrity amidst the pathetic cycles of people who need to run away and cover their tracks as the only way they can gain some control over their future.

These cycles are a mirror for Darryl Johnson, a black low-life private detective forever haunted by his previous abuse when in the army. He is addicted to his job specialising in finding other people’s children who have run away from home to escape their own hidden and secretive problems that threaten to engulf them. These sordid cases overlap with his own past, in a city where he is always painfully aware of the back-street disposability of all the characters he engages with. But there’s this case about a girl called Emma that gets to him, just one case too many, or maybe he just can’t hide from himself any longer… Continue reading

Media Resources linking #Race with #ClimateChange #Migration and #Displacement

The following is intended to be a useful resource comprising videos of the various presentations from a fascinating and provocative workshop. It is for anyone interested in the connections between issues of race, migration and climate change, bearing in mind the academic context of the narratives and language used. This media resource was created and produced by Kooj (Kuljit) Chuhan / Metaceptive Media in association with Virtual Migrants artist collective.

On June 18th and 19th 2013 at Durham University (UK), a group of researchers, theorists and academics from universities across Europe came together to share critical studies and perspectives on the intersection between climate change, migration and race. The ‘workshop’ event was titled:

Race, alterity and affect: rethinking climate change-induced migration and displacement

Introduction to the Race, alterity and affect workshop:

This workshop was developed and convened by Andrew Baldwin, and included two very interesting (and ‘relatively’ accessible) keynote presentations from David Theo Goldberg and Uma Kothari respectively. The presentations generally involve language, concepts and jargon from academia and may be hard to understand for many of us, but what is being discussed is for the most part really worthwhile. Continue reading